Coiled-Through The Eyes Of Director Tim French


Richard Hoyt as Cobb Mills in Coiled. The film “Coiled” are the property of Tim French/Moot point pictures.
Richard Hoyt as Cobb Mills in Coiled.
The film “Coiled” are the property of Tim French/Moot point pictures.

The Shakespearean definition of “coiled” is described as the troubles and activities of the world. Coiled, a new drama directed by screenplay writer and director Tim French, can be described in this way. Coiled is the story of a man named, Cobb Mills (Hoyt Richards) who carries the weight of guilt in the death of his daughter Tess, seven years before. On the anniversary of Tess’s death Cobb returns to the small sleepy town to leave flowers at her grave stone then heads for home. However, this year will be different as Cobb finds that he won’t be heading straight home as planned. Cobb’s car breaks down during his annual visit, and he finds that repairs will take several days. Cobb has no choice but to stay in the town and wait. While he waits, Cobb becomes involved in a series of events that may lead him down the road to either condemnation or redemption.

During his stay Cobb meets and falls romantically for a much younger woman, Nash Fuller (Anabella Casanova) who has her own dark secrets. Cobb falls under her spell feeling that his love for her can break his bonds of guilt and remorse. That is until Nash runs off with $100,000 of his money. Soon, the police is hounding him to turn against Nash, and help them put her away for a long time. Cobb must make a decision he doesn’t want to make because even after Nash’s betrayal he still loves her. Nash’s betrayal hits him hard, and he goes on a self-destructive streak that will eventually lead him to answers he has been seeking all along. Cobb is definitely coiled in the troubles of his world. The question is, will he ever become uncoiled?

David Kagen as Lt. Jackson. The film “Coiled” is  the property of Tim French/Moot point pictures.  Or a
David Kagen as Lt. Jackson.
The film “Coiled” is the property of Tim French/Moot point pictures.

Director Tim French speaks on the making of Coiled and how the storyline came about. Tim French’s Q&A gives us a look at his enthusiasm for filmmaking and writing a screenplay.

Q: Hi Tim. “Coiled” sounds like a drama that many can relate to.  A life ruled by regret of a long ago action can definitely impact a life. I read, on the Coiled Facebook page, that you and Michael French wrote the screenplay. What is your relation?

Michael is my padre and a novelist by trade. He currently has a new book he is promoting called “The Reconstruction of Wilson Ryder”, which is available at amazon.com.

Q: What inspired this story line?

The story line was loosely inspired by the loss of someone very close to Michael and I. Both grieving, we decided that writing about someone who experienced a loss of their own, would be good therapy for us. Next thing you know we wrote the first draft of “Coiled” and the rest, as they say, is history. 

Q: Do you and Michael write a lot of your screenplays together?

Yes, we have written three screenplays together and hopefully we will collaborate on more in the future.

Q: What was the your favorite scene in the film to direct?

Jeez, that’s a tough one. I don’t know. I loved working with all the actors involved so… I guess one of them would be the scene when Detective Jackson (David Kagen) and Sergeant Flanders (Chris Cleveland) question Cobb at the police station. There was just something about the chemistry between the three actors that put a big smile on my face.

Q: Is drama your usual genre or have you also directed other genre?

This was actually my first time directing a drama. Before this I had directed a dark comedy called “Setback”.

Q: When is the release date for Coiled?

As of right now the rough release date is sometime in November. However, I am hoping to have it out before then. You can always check out the status of the release date at

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2828310/combined 

For more on Coiled hit up their Facebook page.

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